Home / News & Events / Related News / Things to Do Before You Start a Job Search

Things to Do Before You Start a Job Search

In my experience, people looking for roles are often led by what roles are on offer rather than thinking about what they truly want from their next career move. This tends to make sense as they are usually busy with their current position and don’t have too much time to spend on the job hunt. It is often a ‘quick look’ at a job board that sparks the interest in pursuing something as a wait and see.

My question to candidates is always ‘what is their ideal role?’ regardless of the position they may be a candidate for. The reason being, if this is a career move that is going to be at least 3-4 year proposition, you need to assess the opportunity against what you REALLY want, rather than letting the role criteria dictate what you think is best for you. As an executive recruiter, this also helps me assess if someone is a suitable candidate for the role.

So here is a small checklist of things to consider:

Culture & benefits – What are the important hallmarks of the culture you want? Is it openness, inclusion, celebration? Flexibility, bonus, career progression, international relocation, additional annual leave, etc.

Values – What are the values of the business and do they align to yours?

Hiring Manager – What is it you want in your manager ? Do you need coaching or do you want autonomy or a blend? What are the questions you are going to ask to establish what’s important to you?

Business results – Is the business tracking well/are they in a good position for growth? This may impact the engagement/motivation of employees.

Portfolio & scope– What will you be working on? Is it something you can see yourself believing in? Are you mandated?

Team – Are you part of a cross-functional team or working in a silo? Is the team collaborative? Will you manage a team? Is this important to you?

Location – Is the role location viable? Can you really handle that commute every day?

Travel – Is there a lot of travel? Is this something you want that isn’t offered?

You can rate these factors or tick yes or no to realise what is important to you. By thinking about this in general terms first, you can then assess any roles as they come up against the check list.

You may not be in a position to have everything on the list but at least you can go into the search with a clear idea on what the ‘ideal’ looks like.

 

Source: Emma Ward

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

*

Scroll To Top